Wednesday
Jan302013

Feb 2 - the Presentation of Christ in the Temple

 

Please click here to read a reflection about the meaning of this important day (when the infant Jesus was brought to the Temple, as the Law required), which occurs 40 days after Christmas.

 

 

Friday
Jan112013

Our Shoeboxes in Ukraine!

Some of the shoeboxes we packed for Samaritan's Purse Operation Christmas Child were delivered to the Ukraine.

Read more here.

Monday
Dec312012

The Circumcision of Christ

Tomorrow (Jan 1st) we celebrate the Feast of the Circumcision of Christ (Holy Communion at 6 pm in the chapel).

Click here to read a reflection about the meaning and significance of this Feast.

Saturday
Dec292012

The Sunday of the Incarnation

Christmas Day - "Our church places before us to-day the two cardinal passages which establish the Divine Nature of Him Who was this day born, leaving the fuller consideration of His Humanity for the following Sunday, the Sunday of the Incarnation.  This order is most fitting, for the Humanity of Christ derives its significance from the fact that it is the Humanity of the Son of God."

The 1st Sunday after Christmas - ". . . until the Circumcision (Jan 1st), the great Christmas truth is still before us, though already the point of view has begun to vary.  On the Day of the Nativity our thoughts are concentrated upon the Deity of Christ; today we think rather of His humanity. Having learned whence He came, we are now taught whither He came, even 'as to us men,' and why He came, even 'for our salvation.'  Having considered the Incarnate, we now learn the meaning of the Incarnation, and pass from the God-ward to the man-ward view of the chief mystery of our faith.  This is, therefore, the Sunday of the Incarnation."

Melville Scott, The Harmony of the Collects, Epistles and Gospels

Friday
Dec212012

The Meaning of the Collect for Advent 4

This is the first Collect amongst the Sundays in Advent which Archbishop Cranmer translated from the Latin rather than writing himself. He based his translation on the Gelastian Sacramentary (6th century) rather than on the medieval Sarum Missal, the significant difference being that the Sarum is addressed to the Son but the Gelastian is addressed to the Father . . . Read more.